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PS2 On iPad

 

I geeked out about a week ago and came up with the following method for streaming emulated PS2 games to my iPad, to be played with a 360 Wireless controller.

  1. I.                    WHAT YOU NEED:

Xbox 360 Wireless PC Adapter ($10-$20)  – http://bit.ly/GOje40

PCSX2 (Playstation 2 Emulator)http://pcsx2.net/downloads.php

Minimum Specs

Recommended Specs

  • Windows XP, Vista, 7 or Linux 32/64 bit
  • Intel Core 2 Duo 3 GHz or AMD Phenom 3.5 GHz or faster CPU
  • GPU that supports DirectX 10 (NVIDIA GeForce GTX series or ATi Radeon HD 2000 series or later)
  • 2 GB RAM (3 GB or more if using Windows Vista or Windows 7)

PS2 BIOS  – You’ll have to dump this from your own from your PS2.  It’s illegal to use anything other than your own BIOS dump.  Don’t illegally download the PS2 BIOS from torrent sites.

SplashTop Remote Desktop ($2.99)  - http://bit.ly/ibzXG2

Recommended Specs

• Windows 7, Vista, XP, or Mac OS X 10.6+
• 1 GB of RAM
• 1.6 GHz or faster dual-core CPU

  1. II.                  WHAT TO DO:

 

1)      Download PCSX2 and install it.

2)      Copy the PS2 BIOS into the BIOS folder within the PCSX2 directory.

3)      Launch PCSX2 and configure it.  This guide will help: http://bit.ly/uQxc3k

4)      Configure 360 Controller within PCSX2 (Config à Controllers à Plugin Settings)

5)      Install SplashTop Remote Desktop on PC and iPad

6)      Confirm SplashTop connection to PC.

7)      Play PCSX2 games on the iPad with your Xbox 360 controller limited by the controller’s reception distance (~30 feet according to the specs)

 

  1. III.                HOW THIS WORKS/LIMITATIONS/WARNINGS:

How it works: you’re probably familiar with RDP, or Remote Desktop Protocol.  It’s the most common method for remotely controlling a Windows-based computer.  The trouble with RDP is that it isn’t optimized for streaming media across the network.  If you’ve ever remoted into a computer and then tried to visit a site like YouTube, you’ve noticed this.

SplashTop uses a proprietary RDP protocol optimized for such media streaming.  By using this program to connect from the iPad to the computer, we’re now able to see and control anything happening on the desktop.  There are competing products, but SplashTop works well and I stopped looking when I found it.  This connection, coupled with the PS2 emulator running on the PC and the controller in your hands, effectively turns your iPad into a portable PS2 monitor.  All the “work” of emulating the PS2 is offloaded to your PC, and the experience is streamed to you.

High Spec Required: This awesomeness comes at a high cost for the PC in question; your performance may vary. The PC is now emulating the PS2 and streaming it to you at the same time, which will require a beefy machine.  I can tell you that my performance has been great so far, with occasional hiccups I am more likely to blame on WiFi than physical resources.

This will only work within range of the controller dongle.  That sounds like a huge limiting factor, but for me (and likely many of you!) 30 feet from your computer covers a huge portion of where you live.  For my part, I can play anywhere in the house on either floor, so you may find this is a total nonissue for you.  Don’t take the 360 controller with you into the bathroom.  That’s fucking gross.

You can riff on this!  My guess is that this would easily work with a PS3 controller via Bluetooth, though you’d be limited by the range of the controller in that case.  But if you don’t have the box to handle the PS2 and streaming…why not try MAME?  Or SNES?  Or NES?  Or really anything at all that’s suited to a lowish resolution?  You could also use alternative products to SplashTop, or set it up on your phone or Android…whatever!  Apply these concepts to new use cases!  NERD OUT!

Posted on
Sunday, March 25th, 2012
Filed under:
gaming.
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